Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Marine Engineering at a Glance

Marine engineering refers to the engineering of boats, ships, oil rigs and any other marine vessel



Marine propulsion is the mechanism or system used to generate thrust to move a ship or boat across water. While paddles and sails are still used on some smaller boats, most modern ships are propelled by mechanical systems consisting a motor or engine turning a propeller, or less frequently, in jet drives, an impeller. Marine engineering is the discipline concerned with the design of marine propulsion systems.


Steam engines were the first mechanical engines used in marine propulsion, but have mostly been replaced by two-stroke or four-stroke diesel engines, outboard motors, and gas turbine engines on faster ships. Nuclear reactors producing steam are used to propel warships and icebreakers, and there have been attempts to utilize them to power commercial vessels. Electric motors have been used on submarines and electric boats and have been proposed for energy-efficient propulsion.[1] Recent development in liquified natural gas (LNG) fueled engines are gaining recognition for their low emissions and cost advantages.


Marine architecture is the design of structures which support ship transport, fishing, coastal management or other marine activities. These structures include harbors, lighthouses, marinas and shipyards.